By Michael Douville

Executing the Strategy will Change your Life! This book is meant to motivate and provide a guide to Financial Freedom Forever! Implementing the plan will provide monthly Cash Flow that is Conservative, Consistent, and will adjust and grow to as much as is needed or wanted. Never miss a Teacher’s Conference, Soccer Game, or Boy Scout outing again. Travel wherever and whenever you desire for as long as you desire. The Strategy of creating a Residential Rental portfolio that will provide Income in good times and bad. Cash Flow for Now, Retirement and a Legacy to provide Income for Generations!
David Gurwitz, Managing Director for Charles Nenner Research: “I have a go to person; Michael Douville. He has a unique ability to help frame a proper mindset and appreciation for Real Estate as a portion of a portfolio.”
John Foltz, Former President of the Arizona Association of Realtors as well as past Chairman of the National Association of Realtors Strategic Planning: ” If you want the plan from someone who has “been there, done that’? THEN THIS IS THE BOOK FOR YOU. Michael Douville shares the plan that worked for him and created a reliable income for life.”

You can purchase the book online from Smashwords and/or Amazon at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/571850.

eBook formatting and cover design by Shelley Glasow at goodlifeguide.com

By Linda Kay

eBook formatting and cover design by Shelley Glasow at goodlifeguide.com

By Vivienne Cass Ph.D.

The Cass theory of lesbian and gay identity formation is well-known to those who work in the field of sexual orientation. Since it was first published over forty-five years ago it continues to form the basis of research studies, provide counsellors and therapists with a framework for helping them to work effectively with lesbian and gay clients, and to be part of training programs for health professionals. Increasingly it is being applied in developing countries as these absorb Western ideas about sexual orientation.

Although the Cass theory was presented over several articles and provides a multifaceted theoretical framework, many have narrowed their focus to its central idea, namely that the process of acquiring an identity of ‘lesbian’ or ‘gay’ can be viewed as a series of six stages. When this occurs, the process of identity formation is often disconnected from the larger theoretical and epistemological context in which it sits, leading to inaccuracies in the way the theory is interpreted.

Mindful of this problem, and also of the difficulty some international professionals and students of her theory have in accessing academic materials, Dr Cass has written A Quick Guide to the Cass Theory of Lesbian & Gay Identity Formation as a snapshot of her theory. In this short book she provides an overview of the theory, integrating, for the first time, all the different facets of her theory that have previously been dispersed throughout various publications. The source material is clearly identified so that readers can go to these references in order to obtain the full account of Dr Cass’ theory. As such it is an excellent resource for researchers, educators and health professionals, whether they are new to the theory or simply wish to confirm their understanding of it. As a bonus, Dr Cass also offers some new insights by addressing the various critiques of her theory and providing her response to each of these.

You can purchase the book online from Smashwords and/or Amazon at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/581890.

eBook formatting and cover design by Shelley Glasow at goodlifeguide.com

By James Peters

eBook formatting and cover design by Shelley Glasow at goodlifeguide.com

By George McLaird

eBook formatting and cover design by Shelley Glasow at goodlifeguide.com

By Claire Youmans

When Azuki, the girl who turns into a Toki, and her brother, the Sparrow-Boy Shota, finally reach their home village to claim their human identities, they find chaos and war, as the brother of the man who killed their parents and still wants to capture Azuki is fighting the appointment of the new lord of the domain. A traveling monk shelters them from battle, hiding Azuki in plain sight as a boy acolyte and Shota as her pet sparrow. In the midst of the fight, Azuki discovers an asset even more valuable than her brilliant feathers. This, she realizes, is the asset the foreigners seek, and this is what the rightful lord – the one who doesn’t want to kill her – can use to cement his claim!
Yuta, the monk, agrees to take them to the capitol and get them in to see the properly appointed Lord Eitaro, but they must outrun the battle first. Karasu Tengu, nasty bird-humanoids that follow battles and harass monks, spot them and realize Azuki is no ordinary acolyte – or ordinary girl. Yuta drives them off, but Shota thinks of his friend, Renko, the Dragon Princess, while touching the Wishing Rock she gave him, and the Tengu realize that he knows a Dragon, the old enemy of the evil Tengu. They vow they will be back with their DaiTengu master, to steal Azuki and challenge the Dragon.
Taking shelter in a outcast’s village where the old and sick live outside the law, they make arrangements to travel with deep-woods colliers as far as the nearest town, and thence to the city where Lord Eitaro might be found. Bandits attack their little group, and Shota flies off for reinforcements. Blackie, Shota’s horse friend, stolen by the bandits, offers his help and that of Red Wind, a roan mare who claims she is fastest of them all.
As they get close to the city, both Azuki and Shota realize how precarious their situation is. They hadn’t thought beyond getting home, not completely realizing that as children, they were completely under the power of adults who could do pretty much anything with them. That would be hard for any children, much less children who can and must turn into birds. Shota tells the Dragon Princess that the Tengu know about her. She will help them, she says, and will be keeping watch. Azuki encounters a Tanuki in the wood who has a surprising message for them both.
Once they reach the city, Azuki spots a new style of loom, one of the many stunning technologies the foreigners have brought. She loves to weave, she’s good at it, and she wants that loom, so while Yuta goes to visit the Abbot at the big Temple and arrange an audience with their lord, Azuki sneaks out – and she’s caught. Has she forfeited her opportunity to see and work the marvelous loom forever?
The Abbot arranges for them to meet with Lady Satsuki, Lord Eitaro’s wife, and their daughter, Anko. There, they can impart their news of the coal discovery, which will ensure Eitaro’s position. There, too, the children’s fate will be decided. How can they be themselves and follow their dreams when the world that has so much power over them doesn’t have a place for bird-children?
Then there’s the DaiTengu, the humanoid form of the monster, that wants Azuki’s feathers for its wind-making fans even if she isn’t a female Tengu.
Can Azuki escape once more? Will the Dragon Princess defeat the DaiTengu? How can Shota and Azuki survive in a human world when they aren’t entirely human? Can they find a way to live as themselves among humans who will accept them as they are? Will they find a way to chase their dreams and make them whole?

You can purchase the book online from Smashwords and/or Amazon at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/554066.

eBook formatting and cover design by Shelley Glasow at goodlifeguide.com

Sep 20

The Point

By Aline Strong

DECEMBER 22 4 AM

The ingredients for the last breakfast are ready. I spread the melted butter, toasted pecans, and extra large chocolate chips on the puff pastry. I cut it, creating small swirls of tan and brown dough, and sprinkle toasted coconut. I nestle each bun into my mother’s dark, old muffin tin, seasoned with years of baking, which accounts for my present figure. When I’m finished, I wipe my hands on my apron for the last time.
A crackle on the baby monitor startles me. It’s in Sally’s room because at three, she occasionally suffers from nightmares. She says something comes to hurt her and no one’s there to protect her. She has no Daddy at the moment.
A woman’s voice leaks out of the monitor: “It’s your turn.”
“Oooh, babe,” a man groans.
The woman’s voice snaps, “Get out of bed and feed that baby!” There’s a loud thump, like a body being pushed onto the floor.
Picking up signals in the ether is unnerving. The first time I experienced it, I heard a cops and robbers TV show. At least, I hope it was a TV show, what with the gunshots. Another time it was a romantic interlude that a stranger—that’d be me—should not have heard.
Unfortunately, my model is out-of-date. I should buy a better one, and I will if the B&B ever makes a profit, and if Dale ever pays child support. Meaning, it’ll be a while.
I slip the tray of buns into the hot oven, and within seconds the smells of warm yeast, melting chocolate, caramelizing sugar and cinnamon fill the air. I’ll wait to eat one. I will wait at least until my guests have two each, no, at least one each.
These may be the last guests I ever have at Riverwood B&B.We are located off the beaten track in the Village of Forest River, an hour north of Toronto. “A little North, a little Nicer,” that’s the Village slogan.
I’ll miss the smiling faces at the breakfast table. They’re a vast improvement over the morose faces I lived with as a kid with my mother and father, or the angry face of Dale, my husband, who is presently in an affair with another woman.
I’ll also miss the naïve questions my American guests ask. They think Canada is England.
“Where’s the best fish and chip restaurant?” There are none. “Do you have any pubs in town?” Yes, but they’re terrible. “Do you serve spotted dick at breakfast?” Not only do I not serve that, but the question alone makes me blush.
The better-informed European tourists ask after poutine, which is French Canadian, so wrong province. Fiddleheads come from New Brunswick, sorry, and crab cakes are best in Newfoundland.
But one and all know to talk about hockey. Unfortunately, no, I can’t get them tickets to the game tonight. I explain they’re sold out for every game in spite of the fact the Leafs haven’t won a Stanley cup since 1967.
I tell them I don’t root for the Leafs; I root for the Los Angeles Kings, who actually win games. This goes over very well with the Americans who like to win at everything.
The baby monitor crackles again. There’s a gasping noise then an ear-splitting scream. I freeze. An hysterical woman’s voice cuts the air.
“What you do? You suffocate him? You bad! I tell.”
There are thudding noises, like people running. What on earth’s going on?
Then a different woman’s voice snarls, “If you don’t shut up, you’re next. Come back here!”
“No, stops push me!”
“You deserve this!”
Then I hear a strangled cry, a door slam, silence.
I press my hand to my heart.
Suddenly, a man’s voice rings out. “What did you do?”
The woman’s voice is inaudible. She’s too far from the monitor now. “You killed them? You maniac!”
Kill? They killed someone? I slump onto a kitchen bar stool.
He roars, “Keep this a secret? To keep my secret? I’ll kill you!”
There are running footsteps. Then all is quiet.

You can purchase the book online from Smashwords and/or Amazon at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/730134.

eBook formatting and cover design by Shelley Glasow at goodlifeguide.com

By Mary Lockey

Emily Jane Putnam, aka Putty, an orphan, lives a peaceful life in a group home in the small village of Garland’s Ford in the southern mountains of North Carolina. Though she has intellectual and emotional challenges, Putty possesses a keen eye and open heart when it comes to life and love.
Just ask Maggie Stephens, the new rector at St. Francis Episcopal Church. Maggie accepts her first call to a church after being honest with the search committee about her sexuality. While she finds a welcoming parish, she also finds love, thanks to Putty. Though Maggie is the cleric, Putty’s purity of heart and her simple understanding of God’s love teach Maggie as much as anything she studied in seminary.
Or ask Anne Calvert, Putty’s elegant neighbor and benefactor. Anne has been widowed for over twenty years. Is her heart ready to love again? Putty says yes! Putty helps revive Anne’s activist spirit with the town council of Garland’s Ford threaten to close the group home.
Ask Sophie, Anne’s spitfire of a sister, about Putty’s ability to understand life and love. In an effort to help keep the group home open for Putty Sophie lands herself in a bit of hot water when she sells ads to go in the church bulletin. It is Sophie who meets Putty after each monthly fire drill in the group home – holding Putty and comforting her through the terror and torment that the fire drill causes. But even Sophie cannot unlock the secret to Putty’s extreme reaction.
Finally, ask ER, Maggie’s Golden Retriever. Lovable ER (short for Eleanor Roosevelt) becomes Putty’s best friend and is with Putty on the day Maggie is brutally attacked. ER is also with Putty at the fire drill when Putty remembers the “fire night” and the threat to “tell no other person” what happened. So Putty tells ER.
Once you meet Putty and her friends, you will want to move to Garland’s Ford. And you will be welcome and made to feel right at home!

You can purchase the book online from Smashwords and/or Amazon at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/555219.

eBook formatting and cover design by Shelley Glasow at goodlifeguide.com

By Christopher Hogan, ChFC, CLU

eBook formatting and cover design by Shelley Glasow at goodlifeguide.com

By Jon Krampner

A crisp, concise (9000 words) account of Plamegate, the sequence of events set in motion when Ambassador Joseph Wilson IV published “What I Didn’t Find in Africa,” his 2003 New York Times op-ed challenging Bush/Cheney lies about the rationale for the Iraq War.

You can purchase the book online from Smashwords and/or Amazon at https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/539367.

eBook formatting and cover design by Shelley Glasow at goodlifeguide.com